Edible experiments

Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences

Edible experiments

From finding out why mustard burns your nasal passages but chillies don’t, the link between beetroot and camels, why you might taste boiled potatoes when you eat cheddar cheese or how beetles can make a surprising contribution to our food – there are experiments for everyone. Watch the videos for an overview of the chemistry, then download the demo sheet to find ideas of how you can present them.

Enthuse your students, excite the general public or just amaze your pals. Let's get people talking about chemistry that's relevant and fun, and help to inspire them.

  • Edible experiments: Bitter orange

    Why does orange juice taste horrible after brushing your teeth? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.

  • Edible experiments: Blowing hot and cold

    Why do spicy foods tasts hot and minty foods taste cold? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible Experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.

  • Edible experiments: Candy coatings

    How do beetles help to make certain sweets? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.

  • Edible experiments: Cheesy chemistry

    What distinct flavours can you detect in cheese? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.

  • Edible experiments: Earth's perfume

    What is the chemical responsible for the earthy taste of beetroot? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.

  • Edible experiments: Investigating invertase

    How are fondant centres in chocolate created? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible Experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.

  • Edible experiments: Love you, honey

    How can honey be solid or runny? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.

  • Edible experiments: Sherbet and popping candy

    What makes sherbet fizz and what makes popping candy pop? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.

  • Edible experiments: Sugar rush

    Why is fudge gooey and why are hard boiled sweets hard? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.

  • Edible experiments: Supertaster

    Do we all experience exactly the same flavours? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.

  • Edible experiments: Temper, temper

    Why is tempering chocolate so important? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.

  • Edible experiments: The heat is on

    Why are chillies and mustard hot, but taste different? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.

  • Edible experiments: Tooth furry

    What causes that ‘furry’ teeth feeling when eating spinach? Discover the importance of chemistry in everyday eating experiences. Edible experiments provides a wealth of ideas based on chemistry and food to engage students and stimulate thinking about the relevance of chemistry.