All Resource articles – Page 14

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  • electron promotion
    Resource

    Ultraviolet–visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy: Explanation of colour

    Why do some compounds appear certain colours? The electron configuration of transition metal complexes is essential in understanding their behaviour. Understand the theory of how d-orbitals influence colour through their shape and crystal field splitting

  • bonding orbitals
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    Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV-vis): The origin of colour in organic compounds

    DIscover how unsaturation in organic compounds leads to colour. Such electon configuration allows transitions between orbitals of lower energy and antibonding orbitals occur when electromagnetic radiation of suitable energy is absorbed by the molecule.

  • crystal field splitting
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    Ultraviolet–visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy: Colour in transition metal compounds

    Transition elements are found in the d-block of the periodic table and the most interesting feature of transition metal compounds is that most are highly coloured.

  • IR regions
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    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy: More complicated molecules

    Learn about the fundamental physics responsible for the IR spectra of more complicated molecules. Bringing together vibrational modes, bond strengths and dipole moments — and how these translate to the recorded spectra.

  • dipole moment
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    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy: Energy levels

    Infrared spectroscopy reflects the type of bonding present within a molecule, learn how the energy levels of bond vibrations and dipole moments contribute to the frequencies observed

  • dispersive spectrometer
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    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy: Uses of IR spectroscopy

    Infrared spectroscopy is a valuable technique in analytical chemistry. Learn about how spectra arise and the instruments used to measure them

  • vibrational frequencies
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    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy

    Absorption of infrared radiation brings about changes in molecular vibrations within molecules and ‘measurements’ of the ways in which bonds vibrate gives rise to infrared spectroscopy. Atom size, bond length and bond strength vary in molecules and so the frequency at which a particular bond absorbs infrared radiation will be different over a range of bonds and modes of vibration.

  • electromagnetic radiation
    Resource

    Introduction to spectroscopy

    Get back to basics with this primer on the principles of spectroscopic techniques, including infrared (IR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). To make it even easier, each technique has clear explanations and descriptions supported by animations.

  • adsorption chromatography
    Resource

    Chromatography

    Chromatography covers a broad range of physical methods used to separate and/or analyse complex mixtures. It can be preparative or analytical and has a wide range of applications.

  • eye rods and cones
    Resource

    Ultraviolet–visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy

    Learn how UV-visible radiation can be used to shed light on chemical identification and how our senses percept colour. From the theory behind molecular orbitals and electronic transitions to the application of this technique with relatable examples. Includes examples and interactive simulations to aid understanding.

  • mass spectrometer
    Resource

    Mass spectrometry (MS)

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful technique in the modern analytic laboratory. Learn the fundamental theory behind the operation of a mass spectrometer.

  • nuclear magnetic resonance
    Resource

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Discover how nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy works, with this series of topics breaking down the fundamental theory. Covering the electronic environment of atoms right up to demonstrating the practical identification of molecules. Includes examples and interactive simulations to aid understanding.

  • Image
    Resource

    Top of the bench quiz: energy (younger paper)

    Test students’ understanding of concepts in energy using these questions from our Top of the bench competition. Use the papers as a whole, or take the parts relevant to the topic you’re teaching. We’ve also included some questions on general chemistry knowledge.

  • AEArtboard 1AE
    Resource

    Starters for 10: Advanced level 1 (16–18)

    This chapter in our Starters for ten series covers quantitative chemistry, atomic structure, bonding, trends in the periodic table, organic chemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, redox, analysis and experimental skills.

  • Image
    Resource

    Smartphone spectrometer

    In association with

    Make your own spectrometer with a DVD and a smartphone camera. This resource includes teacher, technician, and student guides.

  • Preview of a cartoon with students asking questions about endothermic and exothermic reactions
    Resource

    Science concept cartoons: exothermic and endothermic reactions

    In association with

    Spark discussion and stimulate thinking about exothermic and endothermic reactions in a way that encourages pupils to share their ideas.

  • Image
    Resource

    Journal articles made easy: Water oxidation

    2018-12-07T12:55:00Z

    This article looks at photocatalytic water oxidation and producing an artificial water photooxidation system, including how this could be used to generate renewable energy. It will help you understand the research the journal article is based on, and how to read and understand journal articles. The research article was ...

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    Resource

    Wales national curriculum guide: key stage 2 science

    Use this document when planning schemes of work or when looking for resources that are related to specific national curriculum statements.

  • Primary curriculum guide
    Resource

    England national curriculum guide: key stage 2 science

    A linking document for primary science teachers in England, which maps Royal Society of Chemistry resources to statements from the key stage 2 science sampling framework, which aligns with the national curriculum science programmes of study.

  • Image
    Resource

    Reflux with addition

    A reactant is added to the refluxing reaction mixture in a controlled way via an addition funnel. This can be done to prevent exothermic reactions getting out of control. Video: Reflux with addition video